Home Speaking Consulting Seminar Calendar News About Us

 

"FREE Buffaloes
in Our Lives"

e-newsletter

Subscribe
Unsubscribe




Enter your e-mail address and click Submit to subscribe.
Privacy Policy:
Kituku & Associates will not distribute your address to anyone in anyway. Period.

Click the button
below to view the
Newsletter Archive

 

 

Maximum Impact Players

Are you a maximum impact player? Do you perform at a level that makes your chances of failing a non-issue?

Aristotle said that, ?We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.?
In whatever endeavor we choose to pursue in life, there are just a few qualities we can master to increase our chances of success. Qualities that we can depend on in critical moments when our future is at the brink of be determined by the outcome of whatever we are doing.

With the game tied 42-42 and 1:11 to play, the San Jose Spartans needed a 30-yard field goal to beat the nationally ranked Boise State Broncos. The stakes were high for the Broncos. Boise was to no longer be the team with the most consecutive wins, 20 at the time, nationally. The team had not lost in 14 nationally televised games. Chances of the Broncos being invited to a respectable bowl game would be thwarted by losing to a team ranked among the least, not only in the Western Athletic Conference, but also at the national level.

The past glory was well established, but their bright future was at a critical moment. You can imagine the weight and the degree of intensity as the Broncos team prepared their special team for the greatest mission at that moment. Their mission: block the field goal.

Each team?s players ran to their position and the Spartan?s field goal kicker tapped his kicking leg while he waited for the ball to be in place. When the play was on, the ball was passed to the holder who placed it in position for the kicker. In a split second, in that defining moment, the Boise State Broncos did what needed to be done?block the ball. The Broncos had put in position two of their top jumpers.

The game went on to two overtimes before the Broncos outlasted the Spartans with a 56-49 win. This was the fifth time in the season that the Broncos had displayed qualities of maximum impact players.

Meeting with Dan Hawkins, head coach of Boise State University football team, a week after that game, I asked him what it takes to be in a special team. I explained that I would like to teach the concept that we can achieve maximum results in whatever we do, as I had seen his players do time and again.

The response somehow surprised me. Mr. Hawkins didn?t mention talent as the main quality. He said the key is to have people who understand the importance of what you want to accomplish, especially in that critical moment. People who understand the big picture, then focus on the task at hand, and do it with maximum effort for maximum impact. You want people who are consistent.

So first come qualities that can be developed. "And of course talent helps," Dan said. This affirmed my long held conviction that hard work, when concentrated on an expected outcome, will beat talent when talent takes things for granted.

Think about being in a special team at your work. You don?t necessarily need special talents. Understand what needs to be achieved. Understand how what you do contributes to the big picture. Be willing to go the extra mile and give of yourself for the success of the team. Do this whenever you have the opportunity.

In closing, Dan Hawkins shared with me that after the starting players are identified for out-of-town games, a coach next picks players who can play in special teams.

Uncertainties abound in the workplace as jobs keep going overseas and non-stop organizational restructurings lead to layoffs in the thousands. It?s of paramount importance, therefore to have what it takes to perform for maximum impact and to be kept in the special team squad.

Home  Speaking  Consulting Calendar  News  About Us  Contact Us
© 2006 Kituku & Associates. All rights reserved

P.O. Box 7152  �  Boise, Idaho 83707
Toll Free: 1 (888) 685-1621    Local: (208) 376-8724    Fax: (208) 323-7612
E-Mail:
Vincent@Kituku.com

Site Development & Hosting By: www.dhwd.com